How to swing the blow of retrenchment or job loss in your favor

xavier7034 By xavier7034, 1st Jun 2010 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/mj3tu1po/
Posted in Wikinut>Business>Employment

Retrenchment is NEVER a joke, and in today's world, is an ever present danger lurking around a dark corner. Polite terms like restructuring, downsizing, cost cutting merely serve to obfuscate the real issue – so call it what you will – it all comes down to you losing your job, and then having to fill that hole – quickly!

Are YOU going to be hit out of the park when you lose your job?

Starting today, starting now, as yourself this one simple, but important life question:

“What makes ME professionally unique at work?”

Then identify, and be absolutely clear about what makes you special and employable. Don't be shy! If you get stuck at the starting post, then see what you can do to add to your portfolio of job-related skills, starting today, starting now.

Retrenchment is NEVER a joke, and in today's world, is an ever present danger lurking around a dark corner. Polite terms like restructuring, downsizing, cost cutting merely serve to obfuscate the real issue – so call it what you will – it all comes down to you losing your job, and then having to fill that hole – quickly!

One unpropitious upshot of the extraordinary change in the modern workplace is the spectre of redundancy – put bluntly – termination of employment. But to you, redundancy need not be such bad news IF you are geared to make the most of your opportunities.

Do not be caught off guard

Keep in touch with developments taking place in your industry in general, and then specifically with your present company. For the external clues (outside of your company) read the business section of the newspaper, industry-related journals. Closer to home pay attention to the office/workplace grapevine (separate the gossip), company publications, and annual financial reports.

Your strategy these day should be to keep your powder dry, and to be prepared LONG before any “Official” announcements when it may already too late.

Be Different – see retrenchment as a positive for you

Always remember, it is your perspective to decide if you see an event or situation impacting negatively or positively, and a career change should not be any different. “One door closes and another one opens” may sound facile.....but is almost a universal law. Look at it this way – it may actually be YOUR open-sesame to pursuing a career path that you may just have considered before and never acted on.

Do not feel sorry for yourself

Certainly, it can feel as though you have hit a brick wall with the stark reality of job loss being rough on your psyche. Let's face it though, nobody wins by wallowing in self-pity. That attitude will neither get you another job, or pay the bills next month. Again, before the crunch of the mandatory exit interview, you should be out of the starting-blocks and taking positive action by going in the right direction

Shoulder Arms – ready for your exit interview?

This is where you have GOT to be systematic, and a lot of what you do depends on the specific services available or provided by your present company. In-house or contracted placement services is growing field in today's workplace, so check if this this could be one of your options. If the company is run in a professional way, their options could well include:

* Finalizing your payout
* Assistance with your resume
* Future interview coaching
* Career advice
* Counselling.....yes some people need that
* Advice on Super-Annuation (For info See: WIKIPEDIA) and Financial Planning
* Temporary work accommodation

Fair severance package negotiation

Familiarize yourself, and study with your organisations severance policies so that you can be firm and come up trumps in any forthcoming negotiations. Always bear in mid that you have the right to be fairly compensated, and then to be able to negotiate an equitable severance arrangement, structured to match YOUR situation.

Eliminate the negative, accentuate the positive

The worst possible reaction for you is to conduct a “poor me” campaign. Take out the frustration on a golf-ball, or break old plates (the Greeks have a point) – DO NOT vent to anybody and everybody within earshot because 70% don't care and the rest will treat you as a quaint sideshow.

Avoid being one of the lowest common denominator by galloping with the buffalo herd – do not whine or whimper – people will think much more of you if you adopt a level-headed approach.

Don't opt immediately for a similar post

Because of a fear of the unknown, a common response to sudden job loss or change is to opt for the same sort of job you are currently doing. A sensible approach is to bide your time and then consider all your options and decide what you REALLY want to do.

Keep a cool head!

Don't sully the nest

Do not ever leave a job with a bad reputation. Your “chickens” will always come back to roost, simply because the business world is a series of relationships. Try to maintain your existing relationships, because you never know what your future may hold. Wish your former employer and work colleagues every success, with sincerity, and then move on with your life.

Tags

Income Loss, Job Loss, Negativity, Out Of Work, Pension, Redundancy, Retrenchment, Serious Loss, Worry, Worrying

Meet the author

author avatar xavier7034
Enthralling 20 Years experience in the mining industry, starting as a Learner Official, through to Shift Boss, Mine Captain and ultimately to Executive level Mine Manager. Involved in motivation and t

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Comments

author avatar MidgetGem
19th Aug 2011 (#)

I agree with you totally about staying positive and not feeling sorry for yourself. I have been in this situation recently and through staying positive have created new opportunities for myself.

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